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THE MULLENDORE MURDER CASE
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Who has possesion of stolen jewelry from the night of the murder? I do not believe that to be true. As far as blood being on clothing, that would have happened while investigating the botched crime scene. This case has gone on far to long. The disturbing fact is,no one relly seems to want the case solved, other than lawmen who were there that night. They are all retired now but I know for certain Sheriff George Wayman would like this solved and off the books before Chub dies! The sheriff is old and Chub is in bad health.
Strange the Mullendore's are satisfied to let this crime go unsolved. True E.C. caused much grief for them and yes, EVERYONE benefited from his death. He really was worth more dead than alive, none the less justice still needs to be served!
 
Posts: 4 | Location: Dalhart, Texas | Registered: Tue August 12 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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AFter discussions with a private investigator who extensively investigated the case, and a man who was chief of police in Pawhuska years ago,law enforcement personnel were very suspect in several things that happened in Osage County around that time. The person seen wering the Cross Bell ring was a deputy at that time and according to Quitney's book, was one of the first to respond to the ranch after hearing the radio call for help at the ranch. He was (according to the book) waiting on the county road close to the entrance to the ranch. If I am not mistaken, Qwitney even mentions him being seen with the ring. I'll have to check that out again, I've heard too much since reading the book. Has anyone else heard this story?
 
Posts: 6 | Registered: Sun August 10 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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As far as blood on the clothing being from a botched crime scene investigation, the investigator said there was not enough blood at the crime scene for it to have been the primary scene. First responders may have encountered enough to be bloody upon leaving but doubt was cast as to whether anyone else would. If deputy was first responder, it stands to reason he could have "pilfered" before anyone else arrived. Don't believe Chubb killed EC but believe he knows who did and believe Waymon knows, too. Could have been some kind of deal made with Chubb to keep his mouth shut until his death and then the truth will come out.
 
Posts: 6 | Registered: Sun August 10 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by mystery fan:
As far as blood on the clothing being from a botched crime scene investigation, the investigator said there was not enough blood at the crime scene for it to have been the primary scene. First responders may have encountered enough to be bloody upon leaving but doubt was cast as to whether anyone else would. If deputy was first responder, it stands to reason he could have "pilfered" before anyone else arrived. Don't believe Chubb killed EC but believe he knows who did and believe Waymon knows, too. Could have been some kind of deal made with Chubb to keep his mouth shut until his death and then the truth will come out.



It's been a while since i've read the book but by the deputy waiting at the end of the drive are you talking about Mitchell? I don't really remember which one that was. As for my opinion I'm pretty enclined to go with the he asked someone to do it theory. I believe he knew what a mess he'd made of the ranch finances and of his marriage and figured everyone would be better off without him. Everyone's life has meaning and importance but I believe at that point he didn't think he was useful any longer. I could be wrong it's just a theory.
 
Posts: 1 | Location: Pawhuska | Registered: Mon December 01 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just Curious - Your theory is entirely possible, and I know of others who believe that, too. But who actually killed him? Chubb? I still don't think so even though his story doesn't exactly pan out either. Based on other things I have heard from Osage County, it could have been anyone - even someone his Dad hired - particularly someone waiting for EC to get home that night. I believe we will know soon.
 
Posts: 6 | Registered: Sun August 10 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just finished reading the book again (for the third time) and still found stuff I had forgotten or not seen before. The deputy waiting at the ranch the night EC was killed was Bill Mitchell. He has a pretty rough reputation in Osage County, doesn't he? Couldn't he have done it? He knew that Chub and EC had left the ranch because he chased them across the pasture until he lost them. He could have doubled back to the ranch and been waiting downstairs for EC and Chub to return. However, looks like they would have seen him if he had been there, he's never been exactly a small person. What about other unsolved murders in Osage County? There are lots more of them besides just the Mullendore case. It is the biggest, admittedly, but not the only one. What about suspects in some of those cases?
 
Posts: 6 | Registered: Sun August 10 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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SmileDarlin, you are the GREAT-GREAT-GREAT nephew, not the "grate-grate-grate" nephew. I hope the rest of your posts are more accurate than your knowledge of English. Good luck. Look forward to reading them.
 
Posts: 6 | Registered: Sun August 10 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Back to the Mullendore discussion, I was living in the area when the event took place. Memory is not strong, but my daughter & the ranch managers daughter were great friends. Fortunately my daughter wasn't there the night of the murder. I remember driving through the ranch often & seeing hundreds of dead cows from starvation lying in the fields. E.C. had borrowed money from the 'mob' to buy feed as the local banks, feed stores etc had done all they were going to do, & that borrowed money had run out. The speculation was that they sent a hit man in by private plane to do the deed. It was also told that E.C. had a million & a half dollar life insurance policy. The Cross Bell ranch had hundreds of thousands of acres, starting in southern Kansas & extended just to the north of Tulsa & was several miles wide. I haven't read the book.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: Sun September 13 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I am new to the controversy as I just read the Mullendore book over Labor Day, so what you read below may be covering old ground. I see that there are a lot of different theories out there and I may be at a disadvantage as I have not had time to go to Osage County and check the official documents. Since I am a former law enforcement officer, the findings of the investigation stated in the book intrigue me. Based on my background and research done after reading the book, there is little doubt in my mind that Chub was part of the murder, the real question in my mind is if he had help other than E.C.’s. The key to my thinking that Chub did the deed is based on the gunshot wound to his upper right arm. The book stated that when the nurse dressed his wounds that the entrance wound was circled by powder burns which would not wash off. Forensic medicine calls this stippling or tattooing. It is not uncommon if the barrel of the gun is held within a couple of feet of the skin, depending on the type of powder, caliber and length of barrel. The rub comes, if the book is correct, from the fact that Chub was wearing a shirt and jacket which would have absorbed the burned and unburned powder unless the barrel was pressed against the jacket. When pressed against skin, or in this case the jacket and shirt, the gases from the shot enter the wound and will cause the blackened circle described by the nurse.

If Chub was a victim, why did the assailant(s) just shoot him in the arm at a distance of less than two feet? Once you have already killed one person, why leave a potential witness?

If Chub is guilty of assisted suicide, E.C. knew that to make the death look like murder he had to shoot his friend in the back. By placing the gun close to or directly against the jacket, E.C. made sure that the bullet did not injure the bone or worse the brachial artery on the inside of the arm. Chub in turn had to shoot his friend in the head. If he had been a pro or if pros had shot E.C., they would probably have used a smaller caliber gun such as a .25 or .22 and shot E.C. in the back of the head. One more thing points toward Chub pulling the trigger and this may be a little gory. E.C. may have asked Chub to knock him out with the butt of the gun (blunt force trauma on top of the head) before he shot him so E..C. did not have to look down the barrel. Or Chub decided to hit him first to spare his friend the trauma of looking down the barrel. I doubt that a pro would first pistol whip the victim. Blunt force trauma prior to a shot is usually a sign of a crime of passion, not a professional hit. Another possibility may be that Chub, not ever seeing a head shot victim before, did not understand that there can be a lot of involuntary movement of the victim after the fatal shot. Chub may have decided he needed to hurry the death process along by clubbing E,C, over the head. This might also explain the bone chip on the brim of Chub’s hat which was discovered by the deputy; however, if this scenario happened Chub would have had a lot of E.C.’s blood on his clothing had he hit him after the shot.

I don’t think Gene did it unless Chub was involved; because Gene could not have gotten up the stairs fast enough to get away from Chub. Chub’s lifestyle did not change if he had been paid by Gene to keep quiet. Also, Gene fired Chub shortly before the murder and unless it was staged, Chub did not have much use for Gene.

Knowing that both bullets were found, that law enforcement had Chub’s hat, shirt and jacket plus other evidence, it would be interesting to apply modern forensics to this case, assuming the evidence is still around.

Chub might have been bought by someone who was owed money, but since his lifestyle did not change after the crime, I doubt that it was anything more than an assisted suicide committed by true and faithful friends caught up in an irresolvable situation.

I plan on pursuing the Mullendore case further, so I need more data. If anyone has more information than what is in the book or if copies of official documents exist, please let me know where to look.

Respectfully submitted,
Fritz of Fredonia
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: Mon September 14 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Fritz, you have some good points. But a few are flawed. Pros use 22's and 25's to the back of the head? Dime novel BS. Roger Wheeler was killed by John V. Martorano for Whitey Bulger in Tulsa 1981 by a 357 mag to the face. Paul Castellano and his driver Thopmas Bilotti were both shot numerous times in the face. Bugsy Seigel was shot through the eye with a 30 caliber carbine. Carmine Galante and his bodyguard were shot in the chest with a shotgun. In the cases I have read the 22 to the back of the head is the rarity.

While blunt force trauma may be associated with a crime of passion it can also indicate a struggle prior to a shooting. I have worked a few homicides and have seen blunt force trauma in crimes of passion as well as robberies and retribution killings. It would have been a hell of a beating with a pistol to have a bone chip end up on an assailants hat. More likely artifact of a high velocity gunshot wound.

My guess (and it is only guess) is Chub shot EC after a struggle. Chub was known as a mean bastard by the people in the area. He was caught growning marijauna on many of the local ranchs including my uncles. My uncle was as tough as they come and he feared Chub.
 
Posts: 18 | Location: Oklahoma | Registered: Fri June 06 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by Fritz:
I am new to the controversy as I just read the Mullendore book over Labor Day, so what you read below may be covering old ground. I see that there are a lot of different theories out there and I may be at a disadvantage as I have not had time to go to Osage County and check the official documents. Since I am a former law enforcement officer, the findings of the investigation stated in the book intrigue me. Based on my background and research done after reading the book, there is little doubt in my mind that Chub was part of the murder, the real question in my mind is if he had help other than E.C.’s. The key to my thinking that Chub did the deed is based on the gunshot wound to his upper right arm. The book stated that when the nurse dressed his wounds that the entrance wound was circled by powder burns which would not wash off. Forensic medicine calls this stippling or tattooing. It is not uncommon if the barrel of the gun is held within a couple of feet of the skin, depending on the type of powder, caliber and length of barrel. The rub comes, if the book is correct, from the fact that Chub was wearing a shirt and jacket which would have absorbed the burned and unburned powder unless the barrel was pressed against the jacket. When pressed against skin, or in this case the jacket and shirt, the gases from the shot enter the wound and will cause the blackened circle described by the nurse.

If Chub was a victim, why did the assailant(s) just shoot him in the arm at a distance of less than two feet? Once you have already killed one person, why leave a potential witness?

If Chub is guilty of assisted suicide, E.C. knew that to make the death look like murder he had to shoot his friend in the back. By placing the gun close to or directly against the jacket, E.C. made sure that the bullet did not injure the bone or worse the brachial artery on the inside of the arm. Chub in turn had to shoot his friend in the head. If he had been a pro or if pros had shot E.C., they would probably have used a smaller caliber gun such as a .25 or .22 and shot E.C. in the back of the head. One more thing points toward Chub pulling the trigger and this may be a little gory. E.C. may have asked Chub to knock him out with the butt of the gun (blunt force trauma on top of the head) before he shot him so E..C. did not have to look down the barrel. Or Chub decided to hit him first to spare his friend the trauma of looking down the barrel. I doubt that a pro would first pistol whip the victim. Blunt force trauma prior to a shot is usually a sign of a crime of passion, not a professional hit. Another possibility may be that Chub, not ever seeing a head shot victim before, did not understand that there can be a lot of involuntary movement of the victim after the fatal shot. Chub may have decided he needed to hurry the death process along by clubbing E,C, over the head. This might also explain the bone chip on the brim of Chub’s hat which was discovered by the deputy; however, if this scenario happened Chub would have had a lot of E.C.’s blood on his clothing had he hit him after the shot.

I don’t think Gene did it unless Chub was involved; because Gene could not have gotten up the stairs fast enough to get away from Chub. Chub’s lifestyle did not change if he had been paid by Gene to keep quiet. Also, Gene fired Chub shortly before the murder and unless it was staged, Chub did not have much use for Gene.

Knowing that both bullets were found, that law enforcement had Chub’s hat, shirt and jacket plus other evidence, it would be interesting to apply modern forensics to this case, assuming the evidence is still around.

Chub might have been bought by someone who was owed money, but since his lifestyle did not change after the crime, I doubt that it was anything more than an assisted suicide committed by true and faithful friends caught up in an irresolvable situation.

I plan on pursuing the Mullendore case further, so I need more data. If anyone has more information than what is in the book or if copies of official documents exist, please let me know where to look.

Respectfully submitted,
Fritz of Fredonia


www.mullendoremurder.ning.com


I am the grate grate grate nephew of the late E. C. Mullendore III. I will try to shed some light on your questions as the story has been told to me by the family.
 
Posts: 3 | Location: Winfield, Kansas | Registered: Tue August 25 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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quote:
Originally posted by David A Rennie:
I realize that this event is beyond the time frame scope of this forum; nonetheless, it's Oklahoma criminal history. So, here goes . . .

As will be recalled, E C Mullendore III, the heir-apparent to the Cross Bell Ranch fortunes, was murdered by a person or persons as-yet-unkown on September 26, 1970, at his home on the Cross Bell. Many prominent Oklahoma ranching families led lives that intersected with the Mullendore's lives beginning with Grandfather Erd Mullendore, the founder and progenitor of the clan and the original Cross Bell. With some fancy legal and financial footwork, the ranch is still in family hands and is operated by Katsy(EC III's sister) and her daughter.

If one has read Kwitny's book, THE MULLENDORE MURDER CASE, one cannot help but be intrigued as I was the first time I read it in '74 when it was published and again now.

Has anyone of our group taken an interest in the case and, if so, are there any logical conjectures regarding "whodunit" out there?
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: Fri September 11 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Just to let everyone know about the upcoming radio show coast to coast. Come listen in on the new talk show "The mullendore murder talk show" Heard on Blog Talk Radio. You can listen in and find out more about this at the web site by going to: www.mullendoremurder.ning.com Hope to see you there.


I am the grate grate grate nephew of the late E. C. Mullendore III. I will try to shed some light on your questions as the story has been told to me by the family.
 
Posts: 3 | Location: Winfield, Kansas | Registered: Tue August 25 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Concerning the comment by GBE, just a GUESS like he said. I do not see any other way it could have gone down. GBE do you have anymore thoughts on the matter? Here's hoping Bill's show will pull in some additional information that will point the way once again to what so many people have suspected for years. There will always be a division of opinions until real proof is given. Time is of the essence!
 
Posts: 4 | Location: Dalhart, Texas | Registered: Tue August 12 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I have known Chub since I was a kid my dad Tom McHargue worked for Chub I have known Jeff for as long. Chub was and still is double tough and a nice person to be around he's very witty and I have always thought he was very handsome. As for E.C. nobody knows and never will it's all whiskey under the bridge now....
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: Fri January 15 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
<MKoch>
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Hi,

Freelance columist Dale Lewis for the Bartlesville Examiner-Enterprise is writing a book on the E.C. Mullendore III murder case, which occurred on September 27, 1970. The twist here is that it tells of Damon "Chub" Anderson account of the events and his life. Anderson, was in the rancher's home at the time of the murder. His claim was that he was in an upstairs bath when two men entered the home, beat and then shoot Mullendore between the eyes. Anderson stated the he was shot in the arm by the intruders and he had fired several rounds from a .25-caliber pistol at the intruders. Anderson left the Cross Bell Ranch after the incident. Police found no footprints along the route where Anderson stated the intruders escaped through the dewy grass. Anderson, now 69-years-old, is living in a nursing home in Independence, Kansas and has told his side of the story to Dale Lewis, the author of "Footprints in the Dew." No one has ever been charged in the case. This should be an interesting book when it is published.

Mike
 
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Here's a link to an article about Lewis's book:

http://www.taylornews.org/mcc/...n-mullendore-murder/


( formerly Cowboy Dan)

 
Posts: 56 | Location: SE Kansas | Registered: Sat August 16 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Cowboy Dan, That was a good link and a very good newspaper article. I cannot imagine why so many people are opposed to having this crime solved. Hope Chub will tell the truth before it is to late.
I saw the interview with Dale Lewis on the Tulsa News and felt hopeful. I read some of the forums afterwards and they say it will never happen. I hope they are wrong.
 
Posts: 4 | Location: Dalhart, Texas | Registered: Tue August 12 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Homer J still waiting on your updates for this website after some of your shows have aired. So what is new if anything? We want to know.
 
Posts: 4 | Location: Dalhart, Texas | Registered: Tue August 12 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I lived on the Mullendore Ranch for close to three years. We lived in Hulah, and everything in the town was owned by Gene, other than a house next to us where the Briggs family lived, and another house on the opposite side of the rode where the Shook family lived. The Shooks did not like the Mullendore's and I guess it went both ways. We all went to Brown school which was in Hulah, Mrs. West was the teacher, her husband was an engineer at Hulah lake. Kathleen came to everything the school had going on. She always provided the meat for dinners and the familys brought all the other foods. She came to our plays and our competitions and acted so proud when Brown school took honors. My dad and my brother both worked on the ranch. My mother loved living there and I did too, all the kids got along really well and we wander all over without fear. Eventually my brother went to live in the bunk house on the ranch. Gene liked him alot and he liked Gene even though he was often amazed by some of his tantrums. They never had any problems. He went a few places with EC, whom he said drove very fast. My brother said Gene should have sent EC to Stillwater to learn ranch management instead of to OU. Once when my brother still lived with us someone was banging on our door in the night and it turned out to be Gene. He said EC had called in from Pawhuska,as he was to do before he left any place, but hadn't shown up at home even though they allowed extra time for him to get there. Gene had managed to drive his jeep to get my brother. They went searching but did not find EC until the next morning when his car with him injured inside was found over an embankment. Gene loved EC, everyone knew that as factual, however, he and Kathleen were worried about his safety and afraid someone would harm him even back then. We thought it was some of the big rival ranchers he feared. Gene would get mad at everyone in the home at times and they would all leave for awhile to let him cool down.I thought Katsy was away at a school in Mississippi,I could be wrong. I never met her but my brother said she was very beautiful. My brother told me Gene and Kathleen were not happy EC was stuck on Linda, and later married her, but we were gone by that time. I think if EC was beaten and shot that is a very telling fact. Gene would never have allowed his son to be beaten. Now, here is my argument why Gene did not have his son murdered. He had turned the operations over to EC, however, he could still have have hired a financial manager for the ranch anytime he so desired. I am sure Gene was upset with the debt but he had love for and faith in EC to stablize the situation. If not, it was going to be EC who was without a ranch, he and Kathleen were old and wouldn't be around too long. Gene let EC do what he thought best even as the business went down the tubes. I think Katsy and her husband had plenty.Then I recently read all the court documents (with Gene Stipe, Howard Edmondson, and others as the attorneys, and learned what each had to gain from EC's death. Gene and Kathleen were old and hardly capable of bringing the ranch back to being solvent. But the most telling thing is who gave away the most. That would be Linda. She inherited the 15 million dollar life insurance, much of the land, and other things as well, and she dealt it all away to Kathleen and Katsy for about 7 million dollars. She could have kept everything. She disliked the parents, so why did she deal herself out of full ownership and great wealth? Maybe the beating of EC would provide an answer, who hated him, well, Linda, who probably knew at once, maybe by being told, the name of the killer(s)? I suspect that was the Mullendore parents who rather than have EC's children know their mother had their father killed and cause more upheavel and heartache allowed the killer to go free after losing most of what was rightfully her's. Who would ever give up rights to land and money that was left to them without much of a fight unless that was someone who when charged with murder could not inherit anything. Well, that someone would be Linda.
 
Posts: 2 | Location: Interest in the family, once lived there. | Registered: Sat July 24 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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