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Posts: 373 | Location: Indian and Oklahoma Territories | Registered: Wed February 04 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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From the images I have seen of the new movie, there is no scenes with lawmen in pursuit carrying supplies. In the real days they would take a wagon or at least a supply mule. This is another example of movie makers not doing their homework. A trip from Fort Smith to south of McAlester was not a short trip. Hopefully someone will get it right one day.
 
Posts: 373 | Location: Indian and Oklahoma Territories | Registered: Wed February 04 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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One aspect of the book that has always puzzled me was that the girl, Mattie, hired Rooster, a USDM. I'm not aware that such commonly happened. Does anybody know of other cases where USDMs were hired by private citizens for law enforcement jobs?

--meursault
 
Posts: 215 | Registered: Thu December 11 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sometimes families added reward monies for fugitives to be caught. As you know sometimes DUSM would work for railroads or express companies alsong with their federal work. In True Grit, Tom Chaney does have a federal warrant for his arrest, along with a Texas state warrant for arrest. Mattie's money was an added bonus for Cogburn, the unusual aspect was she wanted to go along for the hunt. I have seen where family members were deputized and did join the posse the posse. But they were always young men or grown men. In reality I doubt serously, if any deputy would let a 14 year old girl go on a manhunt in the Indian Territory.
 
Posts: 373 | Location: Indian and Oklahoma Territories | Registered: Wed February 04 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Saw Glenn Campbell at a concert in Tulsa last week. He spoke of being shocked when John Wayne asked him to be in True Grit..Campbell did a horrible job of acting in my opinion but the Duke did a bang-up job...How much of the new version was filmed in Ark-Ok? The original was filmed in Oregon..yuk
 
Posts: 126 | Registered: Wed December 10 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I'm not aware that any portion of the movie was filmed in OK/AR. The exterior shots were in New Mexico. The interiors were filmed in Granger TX, "just outside of Austin" (I lived in Austin for five years and never heard of Granger.) For more information see:

http://www.truegritmovie.com/?...vZ-6UCFc9J2godNSHpXA

Click on "Story" at the top and then go to settings.

--meursault
 
Posts: 215 | Registered: Thu December 11 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Actually the original was filmed in California and Colorado and a little in Mexico according to the internet movie database (IMDb). No mention of Oregon. I have been to the resturant in Ridgway where the Duke supposedly ate during the filming.

Bishop, California, USA

Buckskin Joe Frontier Town & Railway - 1193 Fremont County Road 3A, Canon City, Colorado, USA

Castle Rock, Colorado, USA

Durango, Mexico

Gunnison, Colorado, USA

Hot Creek, Mammoth Lakes, California, USA
(outlaw cabin)

Montrose, Colorado, USA

Ouray, Colorado, USA
(Courthouse)

Owl Creek Pass, Ridgway, Colorado, USA

Ridgway, Colorado, USA

Sherwin Summit, Inyo National Forest - 351 Pacu Lane, Bishop, California, USA
 
Posts: 18 | Location: Oklahoma | Registered: Fri June 06 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Oh well, I never claimed to be a movie historian...But, the fact remains, the snow-capped mountains of Colorado and Cal. no way look like the hills of Arkansas or Oklahoma..Strikes me as a bit phoney, historically speaking....Why didn't they film the courthouse scenes at Ft. Smith at least (original or new movie)..When they were preparing to shoot the remake there was numerous newspaper articles that came out claiming it was to be partially filmed in Arkansas and Ok..wonder what happened?..
 
Posts: 126 | Registered: Wed December 10 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Sadly, it is called the Hollywood version of the Wild West. Anything and everything goes as the truth. The farther you get from reality the better for Hollywood. Hopefully someday their will be a historically realistic movie on the Indian and Oklahoma Territories. As yet it hasn't happened.
 
Posts: 373 | Location: Indian and Oklahoma Territories | Registered: Wed February 04 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I found an interesting article at http://www.awardsdaily.com/2010/11/31797/
It is Jennifer Boulden of the Fort Smith Visitors Center. "The real Fort Smith: fact & fiction behind True Grit." I do question Jennifer refering to Indian Territory as lawless and any crimes committed there were automatically federal cases.
 
Posts: 14 | Registered: Fri October 01 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Ms. Boulden is basically correct. The Indian Territory was pretty much lawless and some areas were worse than other areas. Many disputes were settled by the gun be they legal or illegal. The deputy U.S. marhsals had a hurculean task in that they were undermanned and short of staff. The Indian police could only arrest members of their respective tribes. The U.S. Indian police, which had federal jurisdiction, was also undermanned. The Indian Territory had the highest per capita crime rate in the United States for over thirty years. The Indian Territory was the real "Wild West." You have to remember that the majority of deputy U.S. marshals who got killed in the line of duty in the long history of the Marshals Service were killed in the Indian and Oklahoma Territories. To date just over 200 have been killed, over 130 were killed in the twin territories, with the majority being killed within a fifty mile radius of Muskogee, the largest number in the Cherokee Nation. A fellow could loose his life over his hat, horse, saddle, gun, girlfried, booze, money or just being in the wrong place at the wrong time. Yeah, it was lawless.
 
Posts: 373 | Location: Indian and Oklahoma Territories | Registered: Wed February 04 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Thank you. I guess when you take all things into consideration it was a lawless territory. The Indian Courts did not have jurisdiction over the white settlers and it was up to Federal Court to handle any disputes involving these settlers. I am finding my Great grandfather was not a saint in Indian Territory. He was charged in the Fort Smith Court for murder of a white man in 1869 and later in 1876 for assult with intent to kill another white man. In fact, these assults charges were filed just days before he was shot and killed at McAlester Station by a group of white men.
 
Posts: 14 | Registered: Fri October 01 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Oklahoma kid and Ms. Boulden are very correct. this region was lawless, with very little respect for authority or the law up until 1915 or so. my Great Grandmother lived until she was 98 and was extremely cognitive in her thoughts until the day she died.

her stories of being born in 1896 and her early years in Pittsburg and Latimer Counties were pretty amazing. she saw numerous people gunned down. she said things started to get respectable in certain towns after WW1. In the country and rural areas it was closer to WWII.
 
Posts: 6 | Location: Mcalester-Tulsa | Registered: Sat January 08 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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