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Anyone know where Bywater's Store in the Arbuckle Mountains was located in 1884?

According to Glenn Shirley's citation in Law West of Fort Smith, US Deputy Marshal Mershon and posse tried to arrest a Jim Webb near there on July 15, 1884.

Keep up the good fight, pass the word, and teach others to fight back when unjustly assaulted--be it on the street or in the courtroom. Self-defense is a normal, moral act. So teach your family, friends, and students practical defense against both physical and legal marauders." -----Jerry VanCook
 
Posts: 10 | Location: Independence, MO USA | Registered: Tue January 06 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
<Art Burton>
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Bywater's Store was located near Woodford, Oklahoma, the old Chickasaw Nation, near the foothills of the Arbuckle Mountains. Jim Webb was actually killed by Deputy U.S. Marshal Bass Reeves. I have a complete account of this shooting in my book, Black, Red and Deadly: Black and Indian Gunfighters of the Indian Territory. Eakin Press.
 
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Okay! I was in Woodford about twenty years ago. From what I remember, it was just a couple of buildings one of which may have been a store. Isn't Woodford the hometown of Chuck Norris?

Your book looks like a keeper.

Keep up the good fight, pass the word, and teach others to fight back when unjustly assaulted--be it on the street or in the courtroom. Self-defense is a normal, moral act. So teach your family, friends, and students practical defense against both physical and legal marauders." -----Jerry VanCook
 
Posts: 10 | Location: Independence, MO USA | Registered: Tue January 06 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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[QUOTE]Isn't Woodford the hometown of Chuck Norris?

Woodford does not seem to be mentioned in Norris's autobiography (The Secret of Inner Strength [Boston: Little Brown & Co., 1988]. He does say that shortly after being born his family lived in Ryan. Later the family located in Wilson, OK. But because the family moved thirteen times before he was fifteen, he writes that "as a child, I never knew what it was like to have real roots and a sense of community"(p. 7).

--meursault
 
Posts: 213 | Registered: Thu December 11 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The following was found at:
http://okielegacy.org/carter/woodford.html

Woodford 'Bywater'Oklahoma
I was reading my book ("Ghost Towns of Oklahoma" by John W. Morris) and spotted an interesting little town. The name of the town is Woodford (a.k.a. Bywater). It's located in Sec. 34, T2S, R1W, 11-1/2 miles north, 9 miles west of Ardmore.

According to this book that was written in 1975 and published in 1977, Woodford (Bywater) had a Post Office from February 4, 1884 thru November 22, 1974.

Some other info about Woodford... 1870 the Bywater brothers established their store and blacksmith shop on the south side of the Arbuckle Mountains. The site selected was near where the "Whiskey Trail" entered the mountains and a sulphur spring supplied large quantities of water.

It was first known as Bywater, but when a post office was established the settlement was officially named Woodford in honor of the first postmaster. They say this settlement area before statehood was somewhat isolated and primitive.... Section lines had not been completely surveyed. The road to Ardmore cut across grazing lands or fields southeastward and the roads to northern towns followed various mountan valleys and passes. Stores, homes, and other buildings were usually logs covered with sheet iron or rough lumber. Most houses had one room, although a few were two log rooms with a covered breezeway between them. There was a school started at an early date.

By 1915 Woodford attained its period of greatest importance... The town had a population of approximately 200 with 5 stores, blacksmith shop, barber shop, and hotel. They also had a telephone exchange installed; a cotton gin and a livestock dealer for the agriculture importance of the area. There was also a asphalt mining company headquarters in the town.

By 1920s a consolidated school district was formed and a high school established.

By the 1930s, the depression and WWII were hard on a lot of communities, even Woodford. The school plant was destroyed. State Highway 53 passes along the south edge of what remains of the town. There is a dirt road that past the old store and beside the spring that leads to Mountain Lake in the Arbuckles. At some point in the mid-1970s the spring had been cleaned and a roof built over it and the sides of the pool were somewhat stabilized.

On the Trail
Diron L. Ahlquist
Editor, Oklahombres Journal
 
Posts: 376 | Location: Oklahoma City, OK | Registered: Wed December 10 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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ConfusedThat's right, it is Wilson, not Woodford! I'm going to have to get another Roads of Oklahoma Atlas, I wore mine out.

Keep up the good fight, pass the word, and teach others to fight back when unjustly assaulted--be it on the street or in the courtroom. Self-defense is a normal, moral act. So teach your family, friends, and students practical defense against both physical and legal marauders." -----Jerry VanCook
 
Posts: 10 | Location: Independence, MO USA | Registered: Tue January 06 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Good site LawDog. I had not thought to look there, even though I get get the Okie Legacy via e-mail every week.

Keep up the good fight, pass the word, and teach others to fight back when unjustly assaulted--be it on the street or in the courtroom. Self-defense is a normal, moral act. So teach your family, friends, and students practical defense against both physical and legal marauders." -----Jerry VanCook
 
Posts: 10 | Location: Independence, MO USA | Registered: Tue January 06 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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FYI: Woodford was named for Woodford Smith, an intermarried Chickasaw. Smith had a ranch and store at the site. He was somehow connected with Bill Washington and Richard McLish who ranched in the area in the early to mid 1880's.
 
Posts: 511 | Location: Elmore City, Ok, USA | Registered: Fri December 12 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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From 1902 Daily Ardmorite: Woodford in Ashes
Woodford, a prosperous little town, 18 miles northwest of here, was almost totally destroyed by fire last night. Fire was discovered in W. W. ETHRIDGE’S barber shop, part of the HILL building that had the H. F. HILL drug store. The fire went to J. H. AKERS’ general merchandise store, buildings and contents lost. H. L. LEDBETTER’S general merchandise store on the north was destroyed. There is not a store in town, only a post office, a joint and a blacksmtih shop.
 
Posts: 511 | Location: Elmore City, Ok, USA | Registered: Fri December 12 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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I was told recently that this is also very, very close to where the Lee brothers, Jim, Pink and Tom had their ranch. The location where they killed Deputy U.S. Marshal James H. Guy. Can anyone confirm this information.
 
Posts: 369 | Location: Indian and Oklahoma Territories | Registered: Wed February 04 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The Lee cabin was originally thought to be in Delaware Bend of the Red River a feature situated at the extreme northeast corner of Cooke County, Texas, about thirty five miles northwest of Gainesville,
Joe Roff, in “Reminiscences of Early Days in the Chickasaw Nation,” Chronicles of Oklahoma: June, 1935, p.182ff, brought the location into focus saying:
Jim Lee had married an Indian wife and this gave him ‘right’ in the country. He had a large pasture fenced in on the Indian Territory side of the Red River 12 to 15 miles northwest of Delaware Bend near Cold Branch, a tributary of Caddo Creek, a rather out of the way place and with him lived his brother, Pink. This place was the general ‘hold’ of the bad men and outlaws passing through that part of the country...On the morning of the first day of May, 1885, Guy marshaled his forces at Henderson's store on the Washita some eight or ten miles from the Lee ranch. (Henderson was an early day merchant at Berwyn, present Gene Autry, and at one point & separate location, called Dresden.) The Lee ranch house was a two room log house with an open hall between the two rooms. There was a small window on the north side of the east room with a board shutter and a stick and dirt chimney in the east end of the room. The house had been carefully arranged to resist attack with port holes through which to shoot, one port hole in the chimney and one on each side of the east room. Some two hundred yards east of the house was a boggy branch and when Guy's forces reached the branch they found it so wet and boggy that they could not cross, only Jim Roff's horse reaching the other side, so they agreed to leave their horses with Mr. Johnson and walk up to the house.
The Wellingtonian of May 5, 1885, made a stab at locating the scene saying: yesterday, a posse went over to Deer Range, opposite Delaware Bend, for the purpose of arresting a number of cattle thieves.
The best description comes from the Indian Journal of May 7, 1885: Guy had a warrant for the Lee brothers who live near Dresden, charging them with cattle stealing…The fight took place on Caddo Creek, about 10 miles from the Arbuckle Mountains.
The Indian Pioneer Paper of Robert C. Rowe cements the location: "When the Lee brothers killed Roff and six of his cowhands north of Ardmore, they sent a man to Pete Goodson, who lived near there to ask him to bring his wagon and haul them to the Roff Ranch at Ardmore."
Caddo Creek empties into the Washita River south of the Dresden location. This would place the cabin west of I-35, southwest of present Lake Jean Neustadt. An intermittent stream is marked at this location. Woodford is approximately, as the crow flies, seven miles northeast.

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Posts: 511 | Location: Elmore City, Ok, USA | Registered: Fri December 12 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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In trying to look at an Oklahoma road map today, does that put the Lee ranch near Healdton. I don't see the lake you mentioned or the town of Dresden.
 
Posts: 369 | Location: Indian and Oklahoma Territories | Registered: Wed February 04 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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The Lake is 6 to 8 miles north of Ardmore and lies next to I-35. Dresden is one of the many names given to the present town of Gene Autry. The location as described, at least the best I can determine, would be southwest of the Lake, probably within a mile.
 
Posts: 511 | Location: Elmore City, Ok, USA | Registered: Fri December 12 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Tower you are more familiar with the area than me. But if the cabin was located north of Ardmore about eight miles miles and west of I-35. Aren't we pretty close to Bywater's Store, later to become Woodford? Maybe, a little south of Bywaters? At best a couple of miles.
 
Posts: 369 | Location: Indian and Oklahoma Territories | Registered: Wed February 04 2004Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Be more like six miles southeast, and that's as the crow flies, pretty accurate for a man on a horse in that country, but wagon roads would increase the distance. The Arbuckles are not high but are steep, rocky, and full of gullies, creeks and other hazards wagons were poor at negotiating. Horses on the other hand need only room for their hoofs and body barrel and so can move in a more direct line. But, the ride would be jarring and people are people. Most tend to travel on paths providing the most comfort. You have to remember boils on the butt were commonplace; so were hemorrhoids. No man with time and those maladies is going to take a horse along a path where the horse is required to take sudden hops.

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Posts: 511 | Location: Elmore City, Ok, USA | Registered: Fri December 12 2003Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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