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Colt .44 Peacemaker
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Earlier this year, the curator at the Fort Klamath, OR, museum shared a special possession of his with me. I did not know that Colt ever made a .44 caliber Peacemaker. As it turns out, they made 1863 of them. This particular gun is serial number 2. The gun was given to him.

John

Colt .44 Peacemaker
 
Posts: 48 | Location: Shasta Lake City, CA | Registered: Tue December 30 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Over the years Colt has offered the SAA in several 44 calibers. I believe 44-40 (44 WCF) is one of the most common chamberings for 1st generation SAA's. They have also chambered it in 44 Russian, 44 special and 44 rimfire (the Henry round) in very early guns.

Colt didnt serial by caliber back then. Unless it is a later special edition or something similar. If it is truly marked with SN 2 in all the locations (loading gate, grip frame and frame in front of trigger guard) it would be an incredibly desirable gun with Colt collectors. Value in the hundreds of thousands of dollars.

Here is info from a Greg Martin auction where serial number one sold for $862K

Lot 51 – $862,500: The most famous firearm in the Buck Stevens Collection is the Serial No. 1 Colt Single Action Army “Peacemaker” revolver. Celebrated since its discovery in 1925, only five collector owners have possessed this national treasure Colt handgun. As the first in the unique production run of Single Action Army revolvers – and its copies – No. 1 is an American icon, and among the most revered firearms ever manufactured. A gold-tooled and inscribed leather case was custom made by Arno Werner Bookbinders to showcase the rarity and significance of this important and historic Colt. The price realized for this firearm represents a new world-record price for a Colt single action sold at auction.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: GBE,
 
Posts: 18 | Location: Oklahoma | Registered: Fri June 06 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Going on some memory here, but I believe this was chambered in the Henry rimfire 44. It would not accept a .44 - 40 round. Also, on memory, I believe the grip frame and frame in front of trigger guard were stamped with the number 2, but there was something about the loadng gate... can't remember what. I am not looking at the photo right now, but I think the loading gate may have been missing, or replaced. The cylindar had heavy wear. Also, there was a laniard attachment as can be seen in the photo.

The curator at the Fort Klamath museum, located at the actually Fort Klamath, had the gun appraised at one time, and as he told me it was valued in the many thousands of dollars. He received the pistol from, I think his grandfather (free), but I am not sure. There was a story about the pistol that went along with it too, but not being a gun nut I did not remember it.

Thanks for the info. When I go back up to Fort Klamath, I'll get more info.

jd
 
Posts: 48 | Location: Shasta Lake City, CA | Registered: Tue December 30 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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Here is a link to the pdf flyer of the Greg Martin auction of Buck Stevens collection. One of the revolvers shown has a factory lanyard ring (per the factory letter). Being a gun nut I always pay attention to the stories. As a collector the story can add $$$$$$ if there is provenance.

Doing a little internet research it sounds like a 44 Henry rimfire. 1863 44 RF SAA's were produced. But from what I can tell they were from a run starting in 1875. The SAA was well into production by then so SN2 should have been long in use. If he hasnt he should spend the couple hundred dollars for a Colt historic letter.

The PDF is slow to load as it is picture heavy but worth the wait if you like old guns.

http://www.gregmartinauctions....0Colts%20Catalog.pdf

This message has been edited. Last edited by: GBE,
 
Posts: 18 | Location: Oklahoma | Registered: Fri June 06 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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GBE, thanks a ton. I am really not a gun nut, but I know a lot of folks who do the civil war battles and such, so I know that detail is very important. I do not know this man personally, other than talking to him at Fort Klamath. His name is Kevin, and he seems like a pretty particular sort of guy, a very nice gentleman. When I contact him again, I will mention all of this to him. Of course, it does not benefit me whatsoever (dollar wise), other than the satisfaction of helping someone else, and also the interest factor. History, just about all of it, is interesting to me. So, thanks again for the link provided and the info.

John
 
Posts: 48 | Location: Shasta Lake City, CA | Registered: Tue December 30 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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